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Goodeid Breeding and Conservation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goodeids are endemic to shallow freshwater habitats, such as ponds and creeks in Mexico, particularly along the Mesa Central area, west of Mexico City, with some species found in brackish fringes at both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. There are about 40 species of Goodeid in 16 genera. The temperature range that these fish can tolerate is large (from 14 ° C to 30 ° C) this is due to some of the locations being found at a high elevation where night-time frosts are common in winter.

 

From a biological and evolutionary point of view the reproductive process that the Goodeids employ is very interesting. They are viviparous (giving birth to live young) and have special structures on the abdomen of the young fish and the pregnant females, that have a function similar to the umbilical cord and the placenta found in humans.

 

In recent years there has been a significant reduction in the range and size of Goodeid populations in this region, mainly due to anthropogenic disturbances, such as pollution, eutrophication, habitat modification and desiccation; recent estimates put habitat loss at 80% compared to historic ranges.

 

The Goodeid Working Group is a non-profitable international Working Group managed and run on a 100% voluntary basis. It was established on 1st May, 2009 in Stoholm, Denmark in response to the critical environmental issues facing the majority of wild Goodeid species/populations, plus the poorly-documented ‘disappearance’ of many captive collections.

 

The primary goal of the Goodeid Working Group is to promote collaboration between like-minded hobbyists, universities, public aquaria, zoos, museums and conservation projects in order to maintain aquarium populations of Goodeids while assisting in preservation of remaining natural habitats.

 

As members of the Goodeid Working Group, Tropiquaria is currently breeding 27 species or strains. Three of which are classified as Extinct In The Wild. It is believed that here at Tropiquaria we have the largest number of Goodeid species in the UK and the second largest number  of all Zoos and Aquaria in Europe. With only the excellent and lead member of the Goodeid Working Group, The “Haus Des Meeres” in Vienna, Austria, having more.  The number of species we are breeding will continue to increase over time. Details of our progress can be found in the table below.

 

This table will be updated regularly and is currently correct as of 31st March 2013.

Latin Name

Location / Collection

Details

Conservation Status

Male

Female

Unsexed

Allodontichthys tamazulae

Rio Cobianes

Vulnerable

2

2

0

Allotoca dugesii

Rio Santiago

Endangered

2

1

28

Allotoca meeki

Lago de Opopeo

Critically Endangered

1

0

2

Ameca splendens

Rio Ameca

Extinct In The Wild

50

71

52

Ataeniobius toweri

Rio Verde

Critically Endangered

7

6

47

Chapalichthys encaustus

Lago de Chapala

Vulnerable

1

2

0

Chapalichthys pardalis

Aquarium

Critically Endangered

2

5

30

Characodon audax

El Toboso

Critically Endangered

9

10

30

Characodon audax

Guadalupe Aguilera

Critically Endangered

2

5

2

Characodon audax

Los Pinos

Critically Endangered

1

1

4

Characodon lateralis

Amado Nervo

Extinct In The Wild

4

4

9

Characodon lateralis

Los Berros

Critically Endangered

2

2

0

Girardinichthys multiradiatus

Maravatio

Vulnerable

1

1

0

Girardinichthys viviparus

D Lambert  1989

Critically Endangered

2

3

0

Goodea atripinnis

Aquarium Czech

Least Concern

1

1

0

Ilyodon furcidens

Aquarium

Least Concern

30

45

30

Ilyodon furcidens

Xantusi D Lambert

Least Concern

0

0

15

Neotoca bilineata

Presa de Cointzio

Critically Endangered

0

1

7

Skiffia francesae

Rio Teuchitlán

Extinct In The Wild

2

2

0

Skiffia lermae

La Mintzita

Endangered

0

0

12

Skiffia multipunctata

Aquarium

Endangered

0

2

0

Skiffia multipunctata

Tangancicuaro

Endangered

1

1

0

Skiffia sp.”Sayula”

V188

Extinct In The Wild

1

1

0

Xenoophorus captivus

Jesus Maria

Critically Endangered

3

3

31

Xenotaenia resolanae

Rio Resolana

Vulnerable

3

5

1

Xenotoca variata

Jesus Maria

Least Concern

6

10

42

Xenotoca variata

Marie San Louis Potosi

Least Concern

0

0

24

"Xenotoca" eiseni

Aquarium

Endangered

12

16

6

"Xenotoca" eiseni

Granja Sahuaripa

Endangered

1

1

0

Zoogoneticus purhepechus

Lago de Chapala

Endangered

5

4

6

Zoogoneticus tequila

Rio Teuchitlan

Critically Endangered

9

8

16